You've Been Hired! Here's What to do Next

    You take an audition, spend hours researching it, and write a great piece of content. You hit “submit to client” with fingers crossed and hope your hard work will be rewarded. And then you get the inbox message you’ve been waiting for:

    "Congratulations! After reviewing the custom piece you wrote below,one of our potential White Glove clients has decided to add you to their writing team!”

    Happy days! But a few weeks later you still haven’t received any jobs and you’re left wondering, what was that all about?

    It’s Not About Your Writing … Really

    Here’s the good news: a new client takes you onboard because they like your style of writing. What sometimes happen, though, is that a client adds you to their writing team but may already have a different writer they use and are comfortable with. And as long as that writer is working out, the client may not feel a need to spread the writing wealth around.

    It’s up to you, then, to make sure the client has you on their radar. In other words, if you want the assignments, you must do the work to set yourself up for success.

    How to Engage New Clients

    Marketing oneself isn’t always easy, but for writers, the stiff competition makes it a priority. So, what’s the number one thing to do after you’ve been added to the team? Contact the new client and sell yourself to them. Let them know you’re ready to get started and look forward to working on their assignments.

    Use the client’s Private Message Board to send a brief note explaining what you bring to the table. Emphasize the value you offer and avoid using ambiguous words and phrases like “if” and “maybe” or “just wanted to follow-up.” The point is to remind the client why they chose you.

    Begin with a simple “thank you” and let the client know you’re excited to begin working with them. Then illustrate your best traits to convince them to start assigning you work. Here are some points you may want to include:

    • Timeliness: Good writers don’t procrastinate but do work hard to meet deadlines.
    • Responsiveness: The core feature of successful relationships, responsiveness lets the client know you are open to feedback and that you understand their needs and will do your best to meet them.
    • Experience: Refer to previous work you’ve done in the client’s industry. Be sure to personalize your note by specifically referring to the client’s area of expertise.
    • Ability to adapt voice: Let the client know you excel in a wide variety of tones and approaches.

    Keep your note friendly and conversational and avoid being pushy. If it helps, think of it like an in-person meeting over coffee.

    What to Write

    Here’s a great example of a short and sweet message that hits all the right notes. It was written by a real Zerys writer who recently landed a new client. And don’t forget, these notes work equally well with clients who chose you as their lead writer or who add you to their favorite writers list. Happy writing!

    ACCOUNT ID: AG-5321
    COMPANY NAME: [companyname]
    CONTACT NAME: Philip
    ACCOUNT USER ID: Robert-15962
    WRITER: Jessica - 79818

    MESSAGE TYPE: Private Message Board

    MESSAGE SENT:

    Hello, my name is Jessica and I am so grateful to get the opportunity to work with you.

    I feel writing for you will be a good fit as I have a passion for creating quality-rich and engaging articles on a wide array of topics. I also have my own blog that I use to develop my blogging skills. I'm adept at researching and writing on almost any topic.

    I’m a stay-at home mom, which means I’ll submit articles within 24 hours. When you hire me, you can rest assured that each article I produce will include, when applicable: an eye-catching headline, a compelling introduction, examples, stats and resources, and an engaging and entertaining voice.

    Looking forward to working with you.

    Regards,
    Jessica

    Topics: Advice for Writers

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